State and/or International Certification

  • The Texas Certification Board of Addiction Professionals (TCBAP) is the certification board that oversees the Peer Recovery Specialist credential in Texas.

  • Fortunately TCBAP is the state affiliate of the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC), which means that you can also become an Internationally Certified Peer Recovery Specialist for an additional fee.

  • Reciprocity means that your certification is recognized in other states that utilize IC&RC credentials.

The State of Texas develop a 46-hour Peer Recovery Coach Training (PRCT) that meets IC&RC/TCBAPs certification requirements specific to the Certified Peer Recovery Support


Specialist domains:

  • Advocacy (10 hours)
  • Mentoring/Education (10 hours)
  • Recovery/ Wellness Support (10 hours)
  • Ethical Responsibility (16 hours)

  • Also note that, 40 hours of the curriculum is spread over 5 day, and 6-hours consists of a reading assignment that is completed prior to Day-1.

  • Find a State-approved trainer, such as Lotus Peer Recovery
  • Apply for an upcoming training (* Learn about hosting a training)
  • Complete pre-assignment (6 hours) and submit a summary.
  • Attend 5 days of training
  • Your trainer will submit to State, then your trainer emails your certificate to you.
  • You will submit the certificate along with the other required documents outlined in a certification application packet, which is discussed more below.


*Host a training: If you have a group of individuals interested in the training, you can schedule a training as the host.*

How To Become a Certified Peer Recovery Support Specialist ?

(aka Peer Recovery Coach)

Definition:

Certified Peer Recovery Specialists (aka Recovery Coaches) are persons with lived experience who are trained and certified to provide non professional, non clinical assistance to peers or family members in order to foster resiliency, initiate and maintain recovery and/or enhance quality life. They utilize strength-based approaches to provide 4 types of support: informational (education and skill building), instrumental (resource navigation and direct assistance), affiliational ( social connectedness), and emotional (empathy and trust). For example, they often help individuals develop person-driven recovery plans that are much broader in scope and more community- and recovery focused than treatment plans (Borkman, 1997). They work in a wide variety of clinical and non-clinical settings.